1093 to 1299

 

  • About 1093

                       

The Normans, under Robert Fitzhamon, conquered and ruled the Vale of Glamorgan up to the rivers Ogmore and Ewenny. The river Ogmore runs through the centre of Bridgend and the river Ewenny is to the East of Bridgend.

 

 

 

 

  • About 1100

 

A stronghold was built at Coity on a site which had previously been occupied by the Welsh Court House of Morgan ap Meurig.

 

  • 1199

There is the first recorded reference to Nolton, an area of Bridgend which still exists. In Old English it meant a settlement or old farm and is the equivalent to the Welsh Hendre or Old Town. To this day a part of a track from the Nolton settlement to the ford below Newcastle still exists in Elder Street and Nolton Street.

 

  • About 1200

The Triangle of Fortresses formed by Ogmore, Coity and Newcastle, important to Norman frontier strategy, was converted into the Ogmore Quadrilateral by the fortification of Ewenny Priory.

 

  • 1217

Newcastle granted to Gilbert Turberville the Second, Lord of Coity, through his marriage to a daughter of the Welsh Lord, Morgan Gam.

 

  • 1226

The Welsh from Afan attacked and almost destroyed Newcastle Church and Castle. There were many such attacks as is was vulnerable due to it being outside the main Norman occupied zone.

 

  • 1284

In December King Edward I stayed at Ewenny Priory whilst on a trip from Margam to Cardiff Castle.

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